Skip to content


Resources

I have blogged a lot about a broad variety of different topics. Many people ask me if I can point them out to specific blog posts in a certain area, and it’s hard for me to remember or to have them handy. To that end, I have decided to create a Resources page. Here, you will find a list of topics, and a series of sub-pages with blog posts in that specific subject area.

For example, if you are looking for resources to help you improve your academic writing (how to conduct literature reviews, how to get out of a writing rut), you may want to check the resources under “Academic Writing”. If you are looking for stuff I have written on how to use social networking sites to improve your teaching, research, to communicate with students, you may want to look under “Social Media”.

Each Resources page is independent, but I have cross-linked them all here. I listed a couple of blog posts under each category, but you can find all the blog posts associated with the topic in its separate page.

Academic Writing

This set of posts will show you some of the techniques I use to get out of a rut when I am writing, how to increase my research productivity and a few ideas on how to write research papers.

Organization and Time Management

This sub-page is focused on assembling all my organizational posts, where I describe why I wake up at 4 in the morning to write, how I use short pockets of time to advance my research, and why I clean my office every single day so as to come back to a clean desk every morning.

Teaching Public Policy, Public Management and Public Administration

Here, I have collated blog posts I’ve written over the years on my own self-reflections about teaching public policy, public administration and public management. This includes summaries of books I’ve read, listings of case studies and the case study method of teaching public administration, etc.

Literature Reviews

This set of posts will explain how I conduct literature reviews, how I use different methods (writing memorandums, assembling Excel worksheets to summarize citations and quotations) to ensure my research is broad and all-encompassing.

Surviving and Thriving in Academia

I have been a very strong advocate for balance in academic and personal lives. I’m also a proponent of gender equity, a champion of marginalized academics. I promote empathy and kindness and community building. These posts are related to my experiences facing challenges as a queer academic of color in a globalized academic world.

Social Media in Academia

I have taught dozens of workshops on how to best use social media in academia, and I’ve written about this topic throughout the years. Obviously my advice will become dated as social networking sites change, but some of these ideas are still worth revisiting.

Resources for Undergraduate Students

These posts are specific to undergraduates. I’ve often sent my students here for advice on stuff that isn’t specific to writing, or literature reviews. It includes how to address professors for students, and what do they need to do to in

Resources for Educators

These posts are specific to people who may not teach what I teach (e.g. who aren’t in the public policy, public administration, political science or human geography fields).


Everything Notebook

I keep a single notebook for my calendar, research planning, note-taking, student-supervising and project scoping activities. I decided a long time ago that I needed a system where I wouldn’t need to carry different books around. This series of blog posts explain how I came up with the idea of an Everything Notebook, how I use it for annual planning, project planning, and taking control of my weekly and daily To-Do lists.

Reading strategies

I have collated here a few blog posts on how I do skimming (macro-level) reading, engaging (meso-level) with a printed document, and extracting the most important and relevant information from a paper or a journal article.

Project and Paper Planning Protocols

I’ve written a few posts on how to plan your academic year, and how I break down different projects in components. This set of posts help with planning papers, projects and your monthly, weekly and yearly workload.


0 Responses

Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.



Some HTML is OK

or, reply to this post via trackback.